Seoul to offer North Korea $8 million in humanitarian aid

Lester Mason
September 21, 2017

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Moon said he highly appreciated the recent UN Security Council resolutions against North Korean's "provocations" and said the body's swift action showed the worldwide community was "collectively outraged" by Pyongyang's actions. North Korea was undoubtedly to be the main focus of the meetings.

Trump's threat came during his first speech at the United Nations' General Assembly.

Asked ahead of a lunch meeting with the leaders of Japan and South Korea if diplomacy was still possible, Trump nodded his head and said, "Why not?" "And this is what the worldwide community agrees with, including the U.S., Russian Federation and Switzerland".

Trump did not mention Pyongyang's oil trade.

"Through this support, we expect that the humanitarian situation of vulnerable groups in North Korea will be improved by preventing diseases of North Korean children, treating malnourished children, and strengthening nutrition of pregnant women".

Moon, in his speech, praised the UN's concerted and swift action on the nuke test and called for stronger pressure on the Kim Jong-un regime to bring it back to the negotiating table.

"I promise I did not tell him to use that", Trump said.


"This is why the Security Council sanctions resolutions - including the new resolution adopted last week - include a special paragraph that says that essential lifesaving humanitarian work must be allowed to continue, and that restrictions do not apply to life-saving work for the poor and disadvantaged". He warned the nuclear issue had to be managed stably so that "accidental military clashes will not destroy peace".

Although the approval rate is still high, those surveyed said Moon had fallen out of favour due to North Korea's continued provocations and the government's decision to consider sending aid to North Korea, Realmeter said. "Parties should meet each other half way, by addressing each other's legitimate concerns".

In recent weeks, North Korea has fired several missiles, and some flew over the Japanese island of Hokkaido on Friday.

Another critic of the South Korean initiative, Larry Niksch, a Korea expert formerly with the U.S. Congressional Research Service, said $8 million is a token amount of aid, barely enough to have a significant impact on North Koreans in need.

"If (Trump) was thinking about surprising us with dog-barking sounds then he is clearly dreaming", he said.

The government has chose to provide eight million dollars in aid to North Korea via United Nations organizations.

South Korea's efforts aimed at fresh aid for North Korea dragged down Moon's approval rating. Another U.S. ally, Japan, said Wednesday that pressure, not dialogue, was needed.

Other reports by Iphone Fresh

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