'Bad deal': Trump cancels London trip for embassy opening, blames Obama

Angelo Anderson
January 13, 2018

President Donald Trump has canceled a trip to London to open the new $1 billion U.S. Embassy in the British capital, a move that avoided protests promised by political opponents. "Wanted me to cut the ribbon-NO!"

While Trump has cancelled his embassy trip, he has still been invited to a state visit to the United Kingdom - although no date has yet been set.

In November, Trump was rebuked by Prime Minister Theresa May and others when he retweeted anti-Muslim propaganda material from a far-right British party.

His decision not to come was welcomed by critics outraged by the U.S. travel ban on Muslim-majority countries, and more recently, Trump 's decision to re-tweet anti-Muslim videos posted by a British far-right organisation.

In reality, it was then-President George W. Bush's State Department that in 2008 chose to move the embassy for security reasons.

This was followed by another from Sadiq Khan, London's Labour mayor, who has sparred with Trump in the past.

The new USA embassy is in the Nine Elms area of Wandsworth, London, rather than the famous central London Mayfair location of the current one.

However, Tory MP Tom Tugendhat, Chairman of the Commons Foreign Affairs Select Committee, told Radio 4 that Mr. Trump's decision has nothing to do with the UK's relationship with the U.S.


President Trump isn't afraid to call a bad deal when he sees one.

"He will be met by a million of us attempting a citizen's arrest of him for incitement of racial hatred", one group said, according to the Independent. "Nothing to do with what would have been the biggest protests since the Iraq War", anti-hate activist Brendan Cox said in reply to Trump's tweet.

"Let's hope that Donald Trump also resists the pursuit of his divisive agenda".

In a statement posted to Twitter, Khan said that Trump's visit to London next month would "without a doubt have been met by mass peaceful protests".

Officials have said that Trump still plans to accept the formal invitation from Theresa May but no date has been set.

However, Councillor Ravi Govindia, leader of Wandsworth Council and co-chair of the Nine Elms Vauxhall Partnership, has hit back saying: "If Nine Elms was off-location yesterday, it is certainly centre stage today".

In an article in London 's Evening Standard newspaper on Friday, US ambassador Woody Johnson said Washington was "re-investing in the special relationship".

The US will leave behind an imposing 1960 stone and concrete embassy in London's upmarket Grosvenor Square - an area known as "Little America" during World War Two, when the square also housed the military headquarters of General Dwight D Eisenhower.

Other reports by Iphone Fresh

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