Bookworms extra more likely to find yourself shortsighted

Leslie Hanson
June 9, 2018

Examine writer Dr Denize Atan, of Bristol College, mentioned: "This research reveals that publicity to extra years in schooling contributes to the rising prevalence of myopia, and highlights a necessity for additional analysis and dialogue about how instructional practices is perhaps improved to attain higher outcomes with out adversely affecting imaginative and prescient". "Policymakers should be aware that the educational practices used to teach children and to promote personal and economic health may have the unintended effect of causing increasing levels of myopia and later visual disability as a result". The research involved more than 67,000 people from the United Kingdom who were between the ages of 40 and 69 years old.

The researchers say their study provides "strong evidence" that more time spent in education is a risk factor for myopia, and that the findings "have important implications for educational practices".

Observational studies have suggested a link between education and myopia.

As a result, they found that each year in school was linked with a decrease of 0.27 dioptres - A dioptre is a unit of measure of the power in a lens, and its positive or negative value determines the refractive power of the lens. "Policymakers should be aware that the educational practices used to teach children and to promote personal and economic health may have the unintended effect of causing increasing levels of myopia and later visual disability as a result". The level of difference between the two would mean the college graduate would need to wear glasses for tasks like driving a vehicle, notes Science Daily. Young Jewish boys from these communities had a much higher rate of myopia than young girls as they received a less, comparatively.


By contrast, there was little evidence to suggest that myopia led people to remain in education for longer.

They are yet to identify how exactly more time in education causes myopia. Children from developed East and Southeast Asian countries regularly say that they spend less time outdoors than children from Australia or the USA and randomised controlled trials have shown that more time spent outdoors during childhood protects against the development of myopia.

One limitation of the study was the use of data from the U.K. Biobank. For example, UK Biobank participants have been shown to be more highly educated, have healthier lifestyles, and report fewer health issues compared with the general UK population, which may have affected the results.

A linked editorial also added that in East Asia nearly 50% of children are myopic by the end of primary school compared with less than 10% in a study of British children, possibly due to a combination of intense educational pressure early in childhood and little time for outdoor play.

Other reports by Iphone Fresh

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