Net Neutrality Lives on in Washington State After FCC Kills It

Doris Richards
June 13, 2018

The repeal of "net neutrality" takes effect six months after the Federal Communications Commission voted to undo the rules, which had barred broadband and cellphone companies from slowing down or blocking sites of their choosing or charging more for higher speeds. Opponents of the net neutrality law - including big broadband providers like Verizon, AT&T and Comcast - argued that getting rid of net neutrality would lead to new investment and a more open and competitive internet.

FCC Commissioner Jessica Rosenworcel, a Democrat who voted against the repeal, said on Monday that the decision put the FCC "on the wrong side of history, the wrong side of the law, and the wrong side of the American public". Continue reading to find out what changes today and what lies ahead for the charged issue.

"I think ultimately it's going to mean better, faster, cheaper internet access and more competition", Pai told the Washington Post. They don't want their broadband providers blocking websites or censoring content, and this agency gave broadband providers the legal right to do so. Also, the Senate voted to save net neutrality, though that effort isn't likely to become law.

The Internet Association said Monday that the "internet industry remains committed to restoring net neutrality protections through the courts, legislation, and administrative action".

Internet providers such as AT&T, Verizon and Comcast had to treat all traffic equally.

The sponsor of that companion CRA bill, Rep. Mike Doyle, D-Pa., noted that "an overwhelming majority of Americans" support network neutrality despite the FCC's refusal to follow public sentiment, but that it was "still possible" to save the policy by passing his resolution.


More than 20 states have filed a lawsuit to stop the net neutrality repeal. State officials, members of Congress, technology companies and various advocacy groups are still pushing to save the rules through legislation and litigation. Our approach includes strong consumer protections.

Providers have said they won't block or throttle legal websites, but have left open the potential for charging more for transport of some data.WATCH: What is net neutrality?

ISPs' required disclosures "will allow consumers to make an informed decision about which Internet service provider is best for them and give entrepreneurs the information they need as they develop new products and services", Pai wrote. "Those "fast lanes" will put those who won't or can not pay in the slow lane, making the internet a lot like cable TV". If the only providers that can serve state governments are those that observe net neutrality, these states reason, then it could shape what services consumers are offered, too. Thanks to the repeal, the FCC no longer has that authority. Such a scenario could be particularly devastating for startups with ambitions of becoming the next Netflix or Hulu, as they will have a much harder time paying ISP fees to compete early on.

Martin said broadband providers probably won't mess with existing services like Netflix, as that could alienate consumers.

Yesterday marked the end of U.S. government rules regarding net neutrality, but the new policy faces legal challenges from individual states, some of which have also developed their own rules on the matter.

Other reports by Iphone Fresh

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