AntarcticA is slowly melting

Mindy Sparks
June 20, 2018

An worldwide group of scientists found that the rate of melting of the Antarctic sheets of ice has accelerated threefold in the last five years.

The study in Wednesday's journal Nature is part of an global effort to assess vulnerable ice sheets in Antarctica and Greenland, which are key indicators of climate change.

Back in 1992 till 2017 the continent lost nearly 84 billion tons of ice per year, and within the next five years after that it sailed over to nearly 240 billion tons each year. The problem is that the computer models are, in fact, the only way to predict how many will lose ice in the Antarctic. If the entire ice sheet were destabilized and melted into the sea, researchers estimate it would lead to 3 meters (9 ft) of sea-level rise globally.

According to the study, ice losses from Antarctica are causing sea levels to rise faster today than at any time in the past 25 years.


The study worked 84 scientists and 44 global organizations who work for NASA and ESA.

I am extremely concerned about reports that rate of Antarctic ice loss has tripled in the last decade, said the UN's top representative. Meanwhile, the team found the East Antarctic ice sheet has remained relatively balanced during the past 25 years, gaining an average of 5.5 billion tons (5 billion metric tons) of ice per year. These glaciers have the potential to raise sea levels by more than a metre which are unstable.

The only consolation is that the contribution of Antarctica to sea-level rise remains small: only 7.6 mm in the period from 1992 to 2017.

The Antarctic Peninsula from the air: although the mountains are plastered in snow and ice, measurements tell us that this region is losing ice at an increasing rate.

Other reports by Iphone Fresh

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