Family of youngest Thai boy in cave rescue never lost hope

Annette Crawford
July 12, 2018

The rescue efforts captured global attention for a week, after Richard Stanton and another diver found the boys, trapped by rising waters. They were found by a pair of British divers almost 10 days later, huddled on a small, dry shelf just above the water, smiling with relief but visibly skinny.

The rescue mission began on Sunday morning, almost a week since the 12 boys, aged 11-16, and their coach had been discovered on an embankment 2.5 miles (4 kilometers) inside the winding tunnels.

Australian media said he put his own life at risk to venture four kilometres into the flooded cave to medically assess the 12 boys and their coach.

The members of the "Wild Boars" team, aged between 12 and 16, were guided to safety through the twisting, submerged passages of the Tham Luang cave by a team of worldwide expert divers flanked by Thai Navy SEALs over two days in a meticulously planned operation.

The rescuers have been learning from experience and were two hours faster in bringing the second batch of survivors out on Monday.

"My wife actually grew up with the Thai Navy SEAL that died in the cave".


Dr Harris was the medic who made the call for the team to be swum out after assessing them last week.

According to Thai Prime Minister Prayut Chan-o-chau the boys were given "anti-anxiety" medication before they began making their journey out of the caves, the Guardian reports.

The 12 boys and their coach who were saved from a cave in northern Thailand are doing well mentally and physically, a Thai health official has said, amid an outpouring of gratitude for those involved in their rescue. They'll be allowed to enter the room if tests show the boys are free of infection.

The four boys rescued first are "well, they're up and about", Sky News' southeast Asia correspondent, Siobhan Robbins, said.

Today, the four remaining boys were confirmed to have been rescued and were taken to hospital after Reuters reported that those in charge of the rescue mission were "hopeful" all 12 boys plus the coach would be out today. At least one publisher told the paper that she'd be interested in reading a manuscript that includes details about the boys' coach, a former monk who reportedly taught the children meditation in the cave and gave up his limited supply of food and water so they could have more.

Meanwhile, Manchester United invited the boys to game at their home stadium Old Trafford next season while Portugese team Benfica invited the Wild Boars to an expenses-paid week at its training academy. Mini-sub is ready if needed. "Leaving here in case it may be useful in the future".

Other reports by Iphone Fresh

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