One-day hearing opens with harsh criticism of Trump tariff idea

Lloyd Doyle
July 19, 2018

Trump tore into the EU in a CBS News interview over the weekend, calling the union a "foe" of Washington because of its trade policies, which the president has long decried as one-sided and unfair to the U.S.

They are making their cases today during U.S. Commerce Department hearings into whether the duties should be apply based on the premise that imports are a national security risk.

Ross's remarks came at the start of the public hearing on the proposed auto tariffs.

Trump imposed duties of 25 per cent on steel imports and 10 per cent on aluminium in March, but had given temporary exemptions to the European Union and some other close trading partners as talks continued.

The Alliance of Automobile Manufacturers, whose members include General Motors Co, Volkswagen AG and Toyota Motor Corp, warned on the impact of the tariffs. She says security, counterterrorism, and energy will be on the agenda, as well as trade.


"Higher auto tariffs will harm American families and workers, along with the economy" and "would raise the price of an imported vehicle almost US$6,000 and the price of a USA -built vehicle US$2,000", the group said in its testimony released on Wednesday.

A study released by a US auto dealer group warned that the tariffs could cut USA auto sales by 2 million vehicles annually and cost more than 117,000 auto dealer jobs, or about 10 percent of the workforce.

"Higher auto tariffs will harm American families and workers, along with the economy" and "would raise the price of an imported vehicle almost $6,000 and the price of a US -built vehicle $2,000", said Jennifer Thomas, a vice president for the group.

If he makes good on threats of 20 percent to 25 percent tariffs on autos and auto parts, it would be Trump's biggest yet, the Journal reported, adding America past year imported $176 billion of passenger cars, $36 billion of trucks, and $147 billion of auto components. "We have to - including cars".

Juncker is due meet U.S. President Donald Trump on July 25 with a clear focus on trade after the United States imposed tariffs on EU steel and aluminum and Trump's repeated threats to extend those measures to European cars. The Commerce Department said Wednesday it had made no decisions and aims to complete the investigation "within a couple months".

Other reports by Iphone Fresh

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