Gov. Scott Issues Emergency Order for Red Tide

Mindy Sparks
August 15, 2018

The Governor of Florida issued a state of emergency in response to this year's excessive red tide, the toxic algae bloom spreading across the West Coast of the Sunshine State and leaving beaches covered with piles of dead marine wildlife.

A dead Snook is shown along the water's edge in Bradenton Beach, Florida, on Monday Aug. 6, 2018.

The version of red tide now in bloom along the coast is Karenia Brevis, also known as Florida Red Tide.

"I am issuing an emergency declaration to provide significant funding and resources to the communities experiencing red tide so we can combat its awful impacts", Scott said in a statement on Monday. "I am issuing an emergency declaration to provide significant funding and resources to the communities experiencing red tide so we can combat its awful impacts", he said.

Along with the emergency order, Scott directed an additional $900,000 in grants for Lee County to clean up red tide impacts, bringing the county's total red tide grant funding to more than $1.3 million.

Since 2017, higher than normal concentrations of the algae blooms have plagued southwest Florida.


The Florida Wildlife Research Institute says the number of dead and stranded sea turtles is almost three times higher than average.

The algae turns the water toxic for marine life, and in recent weeks beachgoers have been horrified to find turtles, large fish like goliath grouper and even manatees wash up dead.

He added: "While we fight to learn more about this naturally-occurring phenomenon, we will continue to deploy all state resources and do everything possible to make sure that Gulf Coast residents are safe and area businesses can recover".

Since 2011, Florida has invested more than $17.3 million through the Fish and Wildlife Research Institute (FWRI) in red tide research, including more than $5.5 million for a partnership with Mote Marine to study the causes of red tide. It produces a chemical that can impact human breathing, kill fish and make shellfish risky to eat. Their findings could help to inform potential management actions.

Scott's action also will send more than $100,000 to Mote Marine Laboratory in Sarasota, which has been on the front lines of the algae bloom. "We are actively working with local authorities in the most impacted areas and stand ready to provide assistance to local communities".

According to locals, this year's Red Tide is one of the worst yet.

Other reports by Iphone Fresh

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