Hurricane Florence: Giant, slow-moving storm causes deluge as it makes landfall

Mindy Sparks
September 15, 2018

Hurricane Florence remains on track to bring life-threatening storm surge and rainfall to coastal North and SC, the National Weather Service says.

In addition, hurricane-strength winds are predicted to batter everything in the storm's path.

The outer bands of Hurricane Florence have reached Wilmington, with weather officials saying the storm will bring unprecedented rain to the region.

Yesterday, the European Space Agency released a short video of astronauts aboard the space station watching the storm out of the cupola armed with powerful cameras to capture its giant knot of storm clouds.

The power company has warned that up to 3 million people could be left without power for an extended period of time following Hurricane Florence.

Forecasters said the Category 1 storm's extreme size meant it could batter the U.S. East Coast with hurricane-force winds for almost a full day.

Screaming winds bent trees toward the ground and raindrops flew sideways as Florence's leading edge whipped the Carolina coast to begin an onslaught that could last for days, leaving a wide area under water from both heavy downpours and rising seas.


Hurricane Florence, weakened but still unsafe, has crashed into the Carolinas on Friday as a giant, slow-moving storm that stranded residents with floodwaters and swamped part of the town of New Bern at the beginning of what could be a days-long deluge.

More than a million people along the coastlines of North Carolina, South Carolina and Virginia have been ordered to evacuate.

Forecasters said "catastrophic" freshwater flooding was expected along waterways far from the coast of North and SC.

In a new demonstration of the network's CGI capabilities, hosts have presented from the centre of a digital storm surge to demonstrate the hurricane's damaging potential. To fully drive this point home, before the storm arrived on Thursday, Weather Channel meteorologist Erika L. Navarro delivered the following report using green-screen technology to illustrate just what upwards of nine feet of water could actually look like. "The combination of a risky storm surge and the tide will cause normally dry areas near the coast to be flooded by rising waters moving inland from the shoreline".

Forecasters said that given the storm's size and sluggish track, it could cause enormous damage similar to what Houston, Texas, saw during Hurricane Harvey just over a year ago, with floodwaters swamping thousands of homes and businesses. "We are going to be very very very limited in terms of responding. If you're called to go, you need to go".

"I've never been one to leave for a storm but this one kind of had me spooked", he said.

Other reports by Iphone Fresh

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