Apple Now Openly Tells US Users What Info It Has on Them

Doris Richards
October 19, 2018

There's no guarantee this is all the information Apple has about its users, nor is there a foolproof way for someone outside the company to know their information has truly disappeared from its servers, but at least these options are here.

For example, Apple collects data on users' reading habits to improve suggestions in its Apple News app, but it says that data is linked to an anonymous identifier, rather than a personal profile, and that it is not connected to its other services and can be reset at any time.

To access the portal, you need to go to https://privacy.apple.com and login with the Apple ID associated with your account.

But there is, actually, something new on those pages: Apple's now allowing USA customers to download all the data it holds on them through a new privacy portal.

Downloadable data may include information stored on the iCloud-such as bookmarks, contacts, calendars, and photos-as well as data on purchases from the App Store and iTunes.

You can also request iCloud Drive files, iCloud Mail, and iCloud Photos, but these could take a while to download due to their size. It also gives users a simpler way to make changes to the data, suspend their Apple account or even permanently delete it. We intend to provide these capabilities to customers around the world in the coming months. Until then, these users can still contact Apple via its legal page to request of copy personal data held by Apple. But Apple's practice has been to keep much of that data on the devices themselves and encrypt it with the user's pass code, meaning that Apple does not possess the data and can not unscramble it if asked to do so by law enforcement officials. The company is also rolling out an updated privacy page on its website today detailing what data it does and does not store.


While data breaches are a fact of life having control of what data about us is stored is a positive step.

WWDC 2018: Apple needs to show consumers what it's doing to ensure that 2018 won't be like 1984.

Apple CEO Tim Cook called on Congress to create tougher measures protecting people's data and privacy.

Could Facebook's data debacle force more companies to act like Apple on privacy?

They want to hold tech companies accountable for compromising your privacy.

Other reports by Iphone Fresh

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