Gamma-ray constellation named after Japanese movie monster Godzilla

Mindy Sparks
October 22, 2018

That worldwide recognition even earned the kaiju his own star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame, but now Godzilla finds himself among not just movie stars, but celestial ones as well, as NASA has announced a Godzilla constellation.

The king of monsters laid out its claim as king of the heavens after NASA included Godzilla in its list of gamma-ray constellations.

Fermi has mapped about 3,000 gamma-ray sources - 10 times the number known before its launch and comparable to the number of bright stars in the traditional constellations.

But we're still early in the game, and Fermi's bound to keep expanding on NASA's knowledge of what's out there since going live, for the first time, in 2008.


NASA has um. gone a bit off the reservation when it comes to naming them.

Without a radio telescope of your own that can read gamma rays from zillions of light years across the galaxy, don't expect to look up into the night sky anytime soon and spy Godzilla with your naked eye. They pack enough punch to convert into matter under the right circumstances, a transformation both Banner and the Hulk would certainly appreciate. They considered Godzilla's famous heat ray attack and its similarity to black holes and neutron stars' gamma-ray jets when placing him among other gamma-ray constellations.

In the original 1954 movie, nuclear weapons tests disturb the creature's deep ocean habitat, and it emerges from the sea to wreak havoc in Japan.

Destination landmarks were also given constellations in honor of the countries that participated in the Fermi Mission. These can be from supernovas, super-massive black holes, nova bursts, and other spacial phenomena, according to a statement.

Other reports by Iphone Fresh

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