'I Don't Care' if House Democrats Release My Tax Returns

Lloyd Doyle
November 6, 2018

One narrative has become dominant: that Democrats are likely to gain control of the House and Republicans hold the Senate, if not expand their majority there. That narrative is based largely on national polls, and caution should be urged.

Trump's even-keeled talk comes despite a feverish campaign schedule and a second trip to IN in just four days IN an all-out effort to take down Democratic Sen.

The second is that it gives Trump a boogeyman - or, more apt, a boogeywoman. Aside from Congressional and Senate races, the outcome of a slew of state gubernatorial races will also signal the mood of the electorate two years into Mr Trump's presidency, and two years before he seeks re-election in 2020. "People woke up and said 'Oh, we can't take this for granted". Joe Donnelly, who held a tiny polling lead here Monday. Here's what he had to say: "Even if the Democrats control both houses, Trump could veto immigration legislation that is not to his liking". Compare that with 78 percent of Republican men who are registered voters. Rubbing salt in the wound, they feel Trump's message to help Senate Republicans in rural, red states is a direct threat to the House GOP's cause in suburban areas.

Asked if he was concerned Democrats would force the release of his taxes, Trump replied: 'No, I don't care.

Republicans are favoured to retain their slight majority in the US Senate, now at two seats, which would let them retain the power to approve US Supreme Court and other judicial nominations on straight party-line votes.

At the same time, he has sought to distance himself from any potential blame if Republicans lose control of the House. "And there's no way they'll be able to spin it as anything other than that".

This would be a huge win for the GOP. He estimated turnout would reach 45 percent; that would be the highest for a midterm election in 50 years. Meanwhile, young voters and Latinos would have to stay home.

Democrats are most optimistic about the House, a sprawling battlefield extending from Alaska to Florida. And who pays for polls for the most part?

"To be clear, I will not be on stage campaigning with the President". The Affordable Care Act (aka Obamacare) would very likely be repealed once and for all. And Trump could set his sights on ousting Attorney General Jeff Sessions and other key figures at the Justice Department, possibly ending the department's investigation of Russia's attack on the 2016 election.

Mr Trump, in particular, has played on a visceral fear of weak borders and caravans of migrants heading from Central America to the United States, and of the bogeys of runaway crime and socialist "mobs", if the Democrats gain ground and stall his agenda. That was rewarded, and what message would that send?


It would also be yet another reckoning for pollsters and media organizations that pay for the surveys. The polls now show Democrats with a razor-thin, but consistent advantage heading into Election Day. But if the polls are wrong, it should induce more than a shoulder shrug from outlets that conduct them and the news media organizations that report on them.

Trump's Republican coalition is increasingly older, whiter, more male and less likely to have a college degree.

'Something is happening. There's a lot of electricity in the air.

How it would happen: The path for Democrats in the House is through the suburbs, as in Scenario 1.

If the Democrats win one chamber or both, Klain says, then Congress returns to being a check and balance on the president.

What it would mean: It would be a repudiation of Trump and the Republicans tied to him nationwide.

"This is a very important election", he added. It's possible those races are so close they will not be called on election night.

Deadlines to register and get an absentee ballot are past, as is the deadline for civilians to submit an absentee ballot. The number of absentee ballots requested from counties this year is eye-opening: more than 227,000. Specifically, it could all come down to Mississippi.

Trump campaigned in Indiana Monday, just three days after his last visit, in a desperate effort to take down a Democratic incumbent here. And there are still many scenarios in which the Democrats do just that, and perhaps much more, but the braggadocio of days past is now somehow missing.

Other reports by Iphone Fresh

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