Imelda Marcos faces arrest for graft

Lester Mason
November 9, 2018

Ilocos Norte 2nd District Representative Imelda Marcos (middle) talks to her children, Ilocos Norte Governor Imee Marcos and ex-senator Bongbong Marcos, during a congressional hearing on August 9, 2017.

On the other hand, Marcos was acquitted in three of her other graft charges involving local corporations due to the insufficiency of evidence against her.

The former first lady and an incumbent lawmaker known for her collection of more than 1,000 pairs of shoes was found guilty of seven counts of graft for allegedly maintaining Swiss accounts as a cabinet member during her husband's rule three decades ago.

The family matriarch seeks to replace her daughter Imee Marcos as provincial governor, while Imee is gunning for a Senate seat.

Rosales said the decision was a huge setback to efforts by the Marcos family to revise history by denying numerous atrocities under the dictatorship, and urged Filipinos to fight all threats against democracy and civil liberties.

The family fled to Hawaii in 1986 when the army and the Philippine people turned against the president in a bloodless popular revolt.

The charges relate to alleged illicit financial dealings with Swiss-based NGOs while serving in her husband's government in the 1970s and 80s.


Duterte's spokesman, Salvador Panelo, said in a statement the ruling against Imelda Marcos was proof that the executive "is not in the business of exerting undue interference or influence" on courts, and therefore respects the decision.

The Marcoses have been accused of plundering the government's coffers amid crushing poverty.

Imelda Marcos was acquitted Friday in three other cases, which were filed in 1991 and took almost three decades of trial by several judges and prosecutors.

Is Duterte targeting corruption watchdog investigators?

President Rodrigo Duterte enjoys good ties with the Marcos family and has often praised the late strongman.

Ferdinand Marcos ruled the Philippines for two decades, placing the country under martial law in 1972, during which time thousands of opponents were jailed, killed or disappeared.

A Hawaii court found Marcos liable for human rights violations and awarded $2 billion from his estate to compensate more than 9,000 Filipinos who filed a lawsuit against him for torture, incarceration, extrajudicial killings and disappearances.

Other reports by Iphone Fresh

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