UK PM to giver parliament another chance to vote on Brexit deal

Lester Mason
February 11, 2019

The Prime Minister is expected to ask MPs to give her more time to secure changes to her Brexit deal, as well as promising them another say on her plans, in a bid to placate ministers anxious about a no-deal exit.

Fox was in Switzerland to sign a continuity trade deal with Swiss Economy Minister Guy Parmelin, to ensure trading relations can continue with as little disruption as possible if Britain leaves the European Union on March 29 without a deal.

Prime Minister Theresa May will pledge this week to give parliament another chance to voice their opinions on Brexit by February 27 as she tries to buy more time to negotiate a new deal with the European Union.

The government says that "trading on these preferential terms", as opposed to sticking to the terms of the World Trade Organisation, "will deliver significant savings and help to safeguard British jobs".

However European Council president Donald Tusk said there was "no breakthrough in sight".

"We can't allow that to happen", Sir Keir said.

"There needs to be a day when Parliament says that's it, enough is enough".

The promise is a bid to avert a showdown on Thursday, when parliament is set to vote on the next moves in the Brexit process.


Liam Fox, the global trade secretary, who signed the Swiss accord in Berne on Monday with a Swiss federal councillor, Guy Parmelin, said the deal was of "huge economic importance" to Britain and would benefit 15,000 United Kingdom exporters.

"I think that gives that sense of timetable, clarity and goal on what we are doing with the European Union - taking that work forward and our determination to get a deal - but equally knowing that role that Parliament very firmly has".

In early February, UK Prime Minister Theresa May pledged in an article published by The Telegraph that she would return to negotiations with Brussels to "battle for Britain and Northern Ireland".

There are fewer than 50 days until Brexit.

DIT says that with the agreement the British auto industry, which has consistently warned against a no-deal Brexit, could avoid up to £8m a year in tariff charges on their exports that would apply if the agreement had not been reached.

The backstop aims to prevent a hard border on the island of Ireland has been a constant sticking point in Brexit negotiations with Tory Brexiteers and the DUP rejecting the plan. The prime minister is now in talks with Brussels to seek these changes to the backstop.

A number of government ministers will also be meeting their counterparts across the continent this week, in order to underline Mrs May's determination to achieve a deal.

Other reports by Iphone Fresh

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