Unvaccinated Kids Are Now Banned From Schools In Italy

Leslie Hanson
March 14, 2019

Italian children have been ordered not to attend school unless they prove they have been appropriately vaccinated.

The law, passed in 2017 by a previous government, requires children to be vaccinated against 10 diseases in order to attend daycare and nursery school.

Children under 6 years old will be banned from attending nursery and kindergarten if parents can not provide proof of vaccination.

After months of heated debate, a law in Italy has finally entered into force, mandating that children must be vaccinated to be accepted into school.


The law was slated to go into effect at the beginning of the school year in September, but Italy's anti-establishment Five Star government voted to amend the law, meaning it could not go into effect ahead of the new school year. These vaccines include polio, measles, mumps, rubella and chickenpox.

Parents are at risk of being fined up to €500 (AUD$800) if they sent their unvaccinated children to school and children under six can be turned away.

"No vaccine, no school", Giulia Grillo, Italy's Minister of Health, told La Repubblica.

The fresh law took place amid an increase in measles cases, however, Italian officials declared that vaccination levels have been better since it was offered. Those people believe that vaccines are unsafe and, depending on what misinformation they have absorbed, can cause everything from autism and attention deficit disorder to "vaccine overload", a made-up condition that is not an actual medical term. That's the point at which so many people have been vaccinated against a given disease that those that have forgone their shots will still be unlikely to catch it, but it's hard to see what objective a "flexible" system serves beyond preserving opt-outs for antivaxxers.

Other reports by Iphone Fresh

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