House votes to release Robert Mueller's Russian Federation report

Lester Mason
March 15, 2019

Four Republicans voted present, and eight members (five Democrats and three Republicans) didn't vote.

The resolution was passed unanimously in a 420-0 vote Thursday.

The non-binding resolution calls for the public release of any report Mueller provides to Barr, with an exception for classified material. He has promised members of Congress to send his own "report" on Mueller's investigation to lawmakers, but it's unclear what that will contain.

Despite the House's vote on Thursday, the decision of how much of Mueller's report becomes public still rests in Barr's hands.

But the resolution by itself can not force attorney general William Barr to publish more of the report than he intends to - and that is why even some of the Republicans supporting it complained that the measure was a waste of time.


If a full report isn't released, House Democrats have made it clear they will do whatever they can to get hold of it. Nadler has said he would subpoena the final report and invite - or even subpoena - Mueller to talk about it. Mueller has not indicated when he will complete the report.

U.S. Representative Jerry Nadler, chairman of the House Judiciary Committee and author of the resolution, said on the House floor: "It is important that Congress stand up for the principle of full transparency at a time when the president has publicly attacked the Russian Federation investigation more than 1,100 times and counting".

They have argued that the department is obligated to turn information over to Congress, citing document productions related to the FBI investigation of Hillary Clinton's use of a private email server as secretary of state, and the FBI's investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election.

But Democrats have said they are unsatisfied with Barr's answers and want a stronger commitment to releasing the full report, along with interview transcripts and other underlying evidence. "Full transparency is the only way to prevent future speculation".

While Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell could refuse to bring the bill to a vote, and Trump could always veto it, what this bill will do is at least force multiple Republicans go on record when the majority of both Democrats and Republicans want a full disclosure of Mueller's findings, according to recent polls. "We have no reason to think Attorney General Barr would back away from those statements", Collins said.

Other reports by Iphone Fresh

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