Madrid’s North Korea embassy assailants linked to CIA

Lester Mason
March 15, 2019

At least two of the 10 assailants who broke into the embassy and interrogated diplomatic staff have been identified and have connections to the U.S. intelligence agency.

Ten individuals who broke into the embassy, before tying up and beating staff as they looked for information on computers, remain at large.

Investigators at the Centre for National Intelligence (CNI), the Spanish secret service, believe two of the raiders have links to the CIA, according to sources who spoke to El País. Spanish investigators have already requested the Central Intelligence Agency about their involvement in the incident. The operation was perfectly planned as if it were carried out by a "military cell", said sources close to the investigation.

The CIA has denied any involvement, but Spanish officials reportedly said the agency's response was "unconvincing".

The weird - and movie-like - incident occurred on February 22, when a group of men attacked the North Korea's mission to Spain, located in Madrid.

The attack on February 22 was initially reported by Spanish online newspaper El Confidencial on February 27, prompting Spain's National Intelligence Center and police intelligence division to investigate the case. They tied up eight people inside and put bags over their heads. The victims were beaten and interrogated.

Spanish authorities said police were investigating an incident last week at the North Korean Embassy in Madrid in which a woman was hurt and, according to a North Korean government's aide, computers and cellphones also were stolen.


One of the employees managed to escape and alerted the neighbors, who called the police.

El Confidencial said a police officer dispatched to the embassy was told everything was fine by a man who answered the door, but moments later, "the gates swung open ... and two high-end cars came out at great speed, leaving the area within seconds". Minutes later, two luxury vehicles sped out of the embassy.

Kim had served as ambassador at the embassy until September 2017, when Spain expelled him on grounds that North Korea's nuclear test breached United Nations Security Council resolutions.

Both cars were found abandoned nearby shortly afterwards.

Kim is one of North Korean leader Kim Jong-un's most trusted officials.

The incident took place just days before a key summit between US President Donald Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong-un.

English version by Melissa Kitson.

Other reports by Iphone Fresh

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