New Zealand Massacre Shows How Users Find Ways To Share Violent Videos

Lester Mason
March 17, 2019

Celebrities, political leaders and notable figures from around the world were quick to share heartfelt condolences on social media following the mass shootings in Christchurch, New Zealand, on Friday.

According to authorities, a shooter appeared to livestream video of the attack on Facebook, documenting the attack on Facebook from the drive to the Al Noor Mosque from a first-person perspective, and it showed the shooter walking into the mosque from the auto and opening fire.

Mia Garlick of Facebook's New Zealand office said in a statement to American internet media BuzzFeed journalist Ryan Mac that the company is working to block the shooting video from spreading in the Facebook community.

"Shocking, violent and graphic content has no place on our platforms, and is removed as soon as we become aware of it", said YouTbue. "We are working to have any footage removed". "There were three in the hallway, at the door leading into the mosque, and people inside the mosque", he said.

"Our hearts are broken over today's awful tragedy in New Zealand", YouTube, which is operated by Google, said in a Twitter posting.

Earlier a year ago, YouTube star Logan Paul posted a clip of a dead body hanging from a tree in Japan, prompting the Google-owned video portal to remove his channels from a preferred advertising programme.

The video's spread underscores the challenge for Facebook even after stepping up efforts to keep inappropriate and violent content off its platform.

Facebook and YouTube were created to share pictures of babies, puppies and other wholesome things, he said, "but they were expanded at such a scale and built with no safeguards such that they were easy to hijack by the worst elements of humanity".


In footage that at times resembled scenes from a first-person shooter video game, the mosque shooter was seen spraying terrified worshippers with bullets, sometimes re-firing at people he had already cut down.

But the livestream lasting 17 minutes was shared repeatedly on YouTube and Twitter, and internet platforms were scrambling to remove videos being reposted of the gruesome scene.

Twitter has also been battling to remove shared videos.

However, given the viral nature of social media, videos were still easily searched and viewed hours after the incident transpired.

A Facebook account bearing the same name as the alleged gunman apparently livestreamed the massacre on Facebook, and a manifesto was posted on a Twitter account by the same name as well.

The rampage's broadcast "highlights the urgent need for media platforms such as Facebook and Twitter to use more artificial intelligence as well as security teams to spot these events before it's too late", Ives said. The shooting begins about six minutes into a 17-minute video reviewed by Reuters.

In 2017, a father in Thailand broadcast himself killing his daughter on Facebook Live. "We stand here and condemn, absolutely the attack that occurred today by an extremist, right-wing, violent terrorist", Morrison said.

Other reports by Iphone Fresh

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