New Zealand to change gun law after massive shooting in Christchurch

Lester Mason
March 17, 2019

New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern awed American gun control advocates Friday night when she announced that her administration would promptly pursue changes to her country's gun laws following the shooting deaths of 49 people at two mosques in Christchurch-in stark contrast to the response of the US government to similar attacks.

New Zealand Police Commissioner Mike Bush confirmed the suspect was involved in both shootings but stopped short of saying he was the sole gunman. "Two do remain critical, and we also have one child being well looked after at hospital in Christchurch".

He has so far been charged with one count of murder, although judge Paul Kellar said it's "reasonable to assume" that more charges will follow, after yesterday's deadly shooting.

Police said the suspect took seven minutes to travel to the second mosque in the suburb of Linwood, where seven people were killed.

Mr Bush said police, pathologists and coroners were working to ensure families could claim their loved ones as soon as possible.

- AP A woman paying her respects to the victims of the attack at a makeshift memorial near the Masjid Al Noor mosque, Saturday, March 16, 2019, Christchurch, New Zealand.

The Fijian rugby team also expressed their solidarity with the people of New Zealand after the attacks. In a rambling document that's dozens of pages long, he says he was inspired by Norwegian terrorist Anders Behring Breivik, who was responsible for the deaths of 77 people in 2011. Two others are still in custody.

Former NSW personal trainer Tarrant did not apply for bail when he appeared in court on Saturday and was remanded in custody without plea until April 5.

Ms Arden said the "primary perpetrator" in the shootings had five guns and held a gun licence, adding: "I can tell you one thing right now - our gun laws will change".


She said attempts had been made to change New Zealand's [gun] laws in 2005, 2012 and in 2017 following an inquiry.

"I have been deeply saddened by the appalling events in Christchurch today", she said.

A spokesman said the email did not describe the specific incident and that there was "nothing in the content or timing that would have been able to prevent the attack".

Questions have been raised about why Tarrant had not appeared on a watchlist of New Zealand or Australian security agencies.

This handout picture released by the office of New Zealand Prime Minister shows New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern meeting with the representatives of the refugee centre during a visit to the Canterbury Refugee Centre in Christchurch on March 16, 2019.

Naeem migrated to New Zealand with his family in 2009 and was a teacher.

Speaking to reporters later, Ardern said the country's gun laws will change in the aftermath of the attack on Christchurch mosques by Brendon Terrant, the Aurtralia-born terrorist behind the carnage. Police say that this person was a member of the public armed with a gun with the intention of assisting officers.

It is reported that the man who has been charged with murder is named Brenton Tarrant.

Aziz said: "He gets into his auto and I just got the gun and threw it on his window like an arrow and blasted his window". "These acts of hate have no place in the diverse and tolerant society for which New Zealand is justly known", the White House statement said.

Other reports by Iphone Fresh

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